RJB HOME | PROGRAMS | NEWSLETTERS | STAFF DIRECTORY | SITE INDEX | FEEDBACK | HU HOME
Ralph J. Bunche Center Howard University
 

INTERNSHIPS    INTERNSHIPS    INTERNSHIPS    INTERNSHIPS    INTERNSHIPS    INTERNSHIPS    INTERNSHIPS    INTERNSHIPS    INTERNSHIPS    INTERNSHIPS    INTERNSHIPS    INTERNSHIPS    INTERNSHIPS    INTERNSHIPS   INTERNSHIPS    INTERNSHIPS    INTERNSHIPS    INTERNSHIPS    INTERNSHIPS    INTERNSHIPS    INTERNSHIPS    INTERNSHIPS    INTERNSHIPS    INTERNSHIPS    INTERNSHIPS    INTERNSHIPS    INTERNSHIPS    INTERNSHIPS    INTERNSHIPS    INTERNSHIPS


Patricia Roberts Harris Internship Program

Each year, the Patricia Roberts Harris Program grants a limited number of Stipends that enable students to the opportunity to find an approved unpaid internship in public policy and be supported financially by the program. The stipends are awarded on a competitive basis and are open to undergraduate, graduate, and professional students.  They are available during both the academic year and the summer months. This program provides the students of Howard University with a way of experiencing a variety of work opportunities, that without financial support they may not be able to take advantage of.

 The MISSION of the Patricia Roberts Harris program is to allow students the opportunity to experience traditionally unpaid internships that they have cultivated for themselves in city government offices, city-run programs, and non-profits in order to expand and enhance their understanding of public service.

 While cultivating your own internship takes resourcefulness on your part, many students have been particularly successful at it and have found the rewards well worth their time and effort. Before you can create your own internship, you need a clear understanding of what an internship is and to be able to articulate that well to a potential sponsor. Internships are called by many names - experiential learning, on-the-job training or co-operative education.  Be clear in your own mind about what you hope to accomplish in your internship.  Your main task when cultivating your internship is to convince a potential sponsor that it would be beneficial for him/her to offer you an educational experience. Be prepared to explain your basic goals for the experience in a few sentences.

 Some questions to consider are: 

  • Why do you want an internship?
  • What kinds of tasks do you want to be doing?
  • What skills would you like to use?
  • What skills would you like to learn?         
  • What do you hope to accomplish by the end of the internship?

 Since you must convince a potential sponsor that it is worth her/his time to provide you with an internship experience, be able to tell the sponsor what you have to offer. Decide what you want to learn in return for your services.  Initial objectives for your internship can be established in two ways.  You can state your general objectives and then identify organizations which will fulfill your needs, or you can first identify the organization for which you want to work and then tailor your objectives to the needs of the particular organization.  Whichever way you begin, a final statement of objectives and goals will have to be negotiated between you and your internship sponsor.

  Identify an organization it may be a business, non-profit group, government agency, citizenís coalition, public service organization, educational institution or any other community working towards a common goal.  Once you have decided what you want to accomplish with an internship, begin identifying organizations which might meet your purposes. 

 One way to make your search for organizations easier is to decide on a specific location where you want or have to be.  Once you have established a location or locations, you can begin your research.  After you have decided where you want to be an intern, make contact with that organization.  You will be much more successful in your attempt to create an internship if you communicate directly, by name, with a specific person within the organization. 

 The person with whom you communicate should also be in a position to make a decision about your proposal.  This means you will need to contact the director, or president, or the head of the department where you want to work.  You could also speak directly to the person with whom you would like to be working during the internship.  If he/she likes the idea, he/she will usually be able to sell it to the powers that be. 

 Please contact the Ralph J. Bunche International Affairs Center for application availability

 

About the Center | Bunche Center Newsletter | Programs  | International Affairs Links
International Affairs Summer Enrichment Program | Patricia Roberts Harris Public Affairs Program | The Globe
Opportunities for HU Students | Study Abroad

 

 

© 2001 Howard University, all rights reserved.
Ralph J. Bunche International Affairs Center, Howard University
2218 Sixth Street, NW, Washington, DC 20059
Phone: (202) 806-4363   Fax: (202) 387-6951 or (202) 806-5424
Contacts - WWW Disclaimer