Educational Administration and
Guided Leadership Experience (EAGLE) - EdD

  • Description of Program (66 credit hours)

    The EAGLE EdD program reflects Howard University’s commitment to urban and diverse school systems by expanding the pool of well-prepared educational leaders. EAGLE is specifically designed for professionals and practicing K-12 administrators who aspire to the position of superintendent of schools or some other senior-level position. Exceptions to this target population may be made for up to 10% of the cohort enrollment.

    The program model for EAGLE is based on an interprofessional strategy that utilizes research content from the field of educational administration and five other academic professions: business, communication; social work, political science, and sociology. Students enrolled in the program will receive instruction from experienced faculty, including faculty who have successful experience as superintendents in large urban school districts.

    Successful completion of the program will require a minimum of 66 semester hours which includes 39 hours of credit in educational administration and other education-related courses, 6 hours of internship, 12 hours of interprofessional (cognate) courses, and 9 hours of dissertation research. Students will be required to take at least 9 hours of postmaster’s level courses in educational foundations and research methodologies, if not previously completed.

    Students will be admitted to EAGLE by cohort. Some activities will be scheduled evenings and Saturdays to accommodate working professionals. We are National Recognized by the Educational Leadership Constituent Council.
     
  • Goals and Objectives

    The EAGLE Program is specifically designed for practicing K-12 administrators who aspire to the position of superintendent of schools or some other senior-level position. The program also aims at producing individuals who have knowledge and skill in all phases of the organization and management of educational institutions, especially school systems; who are familiar with the forces and influences which impinge on the process of education; who can use with intelligence, and discrimination the findings of research and evaluation; and, finally, who are sensitive to the interrelationship between school systems and the communities that they serve.