Newsroom

 

Powell Family Gift Establishes Teacher Education Scholarships

powell The Isabelle Thayer Powell Endowed Memorial Scholarship Fund has awarded the HUSOE a gift to provide scholarship support for teacher education students. Committed to the traditional preparation of teachers, the Isabelle Thayer Powell Scholarship Fund will support two students per academic year who are enrolled in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. Students must be in good standing in the School of Education (minimum 3.0). Additionally, students must have a financial need and an interest in community activities with a deep commitment to Pre K-12 public education.


The Isabelle Thayer Powell Endowed Memorial Scholarship Fund was established in 2008 by Mr. & Mrs. Julian T. Powell and George W. Powell to honor the memory of their mother and mother-in-law.  Mrs. Powell was a dedicated teacher and gifted singer. She ended her teaching career at the age of seventy.

For more information about the Isabell Thayer Powell Endowed Memorial Scholarship, go to the "Scholarships/Fellowships" link on the HUSOE website at www.howard.edu/schooleducation.


Author James Patterson Funds Teacher Education Scholarships

jamespattersonBestselling mystery and children’s book author, James Patterson recently awarded the HUSOE a gift which will support eight teacher education scholarships. Known for his detective novels such as the well-known Alex Cross series, Patterson and his wife Susan have funded scholarship programs for teacher education programs at Vanderbilt University, University of Wisconsin, and Michigan State University. In a letter to Howard University President Sidney A. Ribeau, Patterson noted that he was “impressed with the School of Education.” In discussing the award, Dean Fenwick remarked, “Mr. Patterson’s commitment to a new generation of teachers equipped to stimulate students’ enjoyment of reading and boost national literacy rates is laudable. We are ecstatic about Mr. Patterson’s generous support of our pre-service teachers and his commitment to the School of Education.”


NSF Awards $1 Million for HBCU Math and Science Teacher Study

NogueraDr. Kimberly Freeman, associate professor of educational psychology in the Department of Human Development and Psychoeducational Studies, was awarded $1.1 million to support her study of HBCU models of math and science teacher preparation.   The aim of What Works in Producing African American Science and Math Teachers at HBCUs is to discover those factors influencing HBCU’s production of African-American PK-12 science and math teachers.  The multi-method investigation includes case studies of science and math teacher education programs at HBCUs; interviews of current African-American science and math teachers who are recent graduates of HBCUs; and, a longitudinal survey of a freshman cohort of science and math majors at an HBCU.  Dr. Freeman expects the investigation to yield data that can be used to strengthen science and math teacher preparation programs at HBCU’s; improve recruitment of prospective science and math teachers; and inform higher education policy.  Without replenishing the supply of highly-qualified African-American science and math teachers, the continuation of future cohorts of African-American scientists and mathematicians is in jeopardy.  Dr. Freeman believes, “Equipped with reliable scientific information, HBCUs can take a leadership role in becoming major suppliers of African-American science and math educators.”


Doctoral Student Contributes Chapter to Award Winning Book


bookcoverAntonio Ellis, a doctoral student in the School of Education’s Department of Educational Administration and Policy, is a contributing author to Using Standards and High-Stakes Testing for Students: Exploiting Power with Critical Pedagogy edited by Gorlewski et al (2012). The book is recipient of the 2012 Critics Choice Award from the American Educational Studies Association (AESA). The Critics’ Choice Award serves to recognize and increase awareness of recent scholarship deemed to be outstanding in its field and of potential interest to those in educational studies. Ellis’ chapter is, Just What is Response to Intervention and What’s It Doing in a Nice Field Like Education? A Critical Race Theory Examination of Response to Intervention. To read more about the book go to: http://www.educationalstudies.org/awards.html 


Strong Foundation Gift to HUSOE for Teacher Education

HStrong The Hattie M. Strong Foundation has awarded the HUSOE a gift to provide scholarship support for teacher education students. Committed to the traditional preparation of teachers, the Strong Foundation will support two students per year who are enrolled in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. The 2011 Strong Teacher-Scholars are Leslee C. Clerkley and Rebecca Millard and last year's 2010 Strong Teacher-Scholars were Tylah D. Davies and Omore' Okhomina, students in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. The Hattie M. Strong Foundation was created in 1928 under the auspices of Ms. Hattie M. Strong, an individual with immense energy and a variety of interests whose philanthropic endeavors included building hospitals, educational institutions, and social service agencies in the United States, Europe, Asia and Africa. A consistent theme which ran through all of her philanthropic activities was a desire to help people help themselves. For more information about the Strong Teachers go to the "Scholarships/Fellowships" link on the HUSOE website at www.howard.edu/schooleducation.


Ready to Teach, $2.1 Million Grant Program Welcomes Cohort IV

RTTphotoSupported by a $2.1 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education, the HUSOE's Ready to Teach Program is designed to recruit and prepare underrepresented populations as PK-12 classroom teachers. The program is led by the HUSOE in partnership with 5 urban districts: Prince George's County (Maryland); Washington, DC; Chicago, Houston and Clayton County (outside of Atlanta, GA). Ready to Teach Scholars have professional mentors assigned to them throughout the program, participate in a summer institute and on-line learning communities, and pledge at least 3-years of service as a classroom teacher to one of the partner districts. Begun in 2007, the program has already produced a Teacher-of-the-Year. For more information about Ready to Teach, go to the "Become a Teacher" link on the HUSOE website at www.howard.edu/schooleducation.


Secretary of Education Discusses TEACH Campaign

duncanOn Wednesday, November 12, 2010, Howard University hosted Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, musician John Legend, Interim DCPS Chancellor Kaya Henderson, and Teacher-of-the-Year Angela Benjamin. The program -- moderated by Dean Leslie Fenwick and attended by 10 HBCU School/College of Education deans -- was the first stop in the Secretary's TEACH Campaign. TEACH is a national effort to encourage college students to chose the teaching profession.

Secretary Duncan cited the need for more teachers of color. Dean Fenwick informed the audience about the HUSOE's Ready to Teach Program. Funded in 2007 with a $2.1 million award, Ready to Teach recruits and prepares African American men (and other underrepresented groups) as teachers in 5 partner urban school districts including: DCPS, Prince George's County (MD), Chicago, Houston, and Clayton County Schools (GA). The program has already produced a Teacher-of-the-Year.

To read more about Ready to Teach go to www.howard.edu/schooleducation/. Read Essence Magazine's blog coverage of the TEACH Campaign at Howard University in the article, "Wanted : More Black Teachers," quoting HUSOE student, Victoria J. Payne, a second year master's student in elementary education who is a Rand Scholar.

http://blogs.essence.com/obamawatch/2010/11/wanted-black-teachers.php


Dean Weighs in on Education Nation Discussion

fenwickAs part of this week's Education Nation coverage, Dean Leslie T. Fenwick appeared on NBC4 Viewpoint to discuss education reform. She participated with Brian W. Jones, J.D., chair, of the D.C. Public Charter School Board and President of Latimer Education, Inc. and Tehani Collazo, Ph.D., senior director, Community and School-Based Programs CentroNía. Additionally, her article about African American male teachers was published on NBC's The Grio (http://ow.ly/2LE8Y).
To view coverage of Education Nation, click here.


Member of National Academy of Education Delivers HUSOE Thompson Lecture

LDHDr. Linda Darling-Hammond, the Charles Ducommon Professor of Education at Stanford University, delivered the 30th Annual Charles Thompson Lecture on Wednesday, November 3, 2010 at 5:00 pm in the Blackburn Center, West Ballroom.

In addition to being a member of the National Academy of Education and a past president of the American Educational Research Association (AERA), Dr. Darling-Hammond served as education policy advisor to then-Senator Barack Obama during his presidential campaign. Dr. Darling-Hammond's research focuses on educational equity, teacher quality and school restructuring.

The Charles Thompson Lecture-Colloquium is held annually by the HUSOE and the Journal of Negro Education (JNE). JNE, the seminal research organ of the HUSOE, has been in continuous publication as a referred scholarly journal for more than 75 years. JNE "examines issues incident to the education of Black people" and was founded by Charles Thompson.


Students receive the Helen Matthews Rand Endowed Scholarship

randscholarsTwo students from the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, Jason McNeil and Michelle Taylor, received the Helen Matthews Rand Endowed Scholarship for the 2010-2011 academic school year. Their acceptance of the award was celebrated on Friday, September 17th at the Rand Scholar's Luncheon. Both students will be teaching at the Howard Middle School of Mathematics and Science.

The scholarship provides a $15,000 annual award (for up to 2 years) and a laptop to exceptional students pursuing a degree in teacher education. Recipients must make a 2-year commitment to teaching in an inner-city or urban environment directly upon completing their HUSOE degree. Applicants must pursue a course of study leading to a career in teaching grades PK-12.

In 1999, Addison Barry Rand, a former Fortune 500 executive and the current chairman of Howard University's Board of Trustees, endowed a $1 million  scholarship fund in his mother's name for the School of Education. According to Rand, the Helen Matthews Rand Endowed Scholarship was established in recognition of his late mother's distinguished career and dedication to urban education and community service. Mrs. Rand, a graduate of the esteemed Miner Teachers College, was  a teacher and a principal in DC Public Schools for more than two decades.


Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, Inc. is holding its 40th Annual Legislative Conference, September 15-18

capitol_smallAttention: open in a new window.The Congressional Black Caucus Foundation’s (CBCF) Emerging Leaders Series (ELS) will focus on equipping students and young professionals with legislative and advocacy tools to affect change in their communities. Since its inception six years ago, the series has become one of the most popular attractions at CBCF’s Annual Legislative Conference. The series, presented from September 16-18 at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center, will include: a town hall meeting; a roundtable with young elected officials, policy professionals and the Obama administration; and an instant apprentice luncheon, matching up attendees with leading African-American professionals.

ELS Highlights:

  • The Changing Tides? Historically Black Colleges and Universities in the “Post-Racial” Society - Emerging leaders will examine current debates about factors that support or threaten the existence of HBCUs, including a shortage of human and financial resources.

  • Tis the Best of Times, ‘Tis the Worst of Times - Emerging Leaders will learn how to build their net worth in this recession-ridden economy.

  • The Politics of Health: Where Do We Fit In? - This panel will address key health issues and the ways in which Emerging Leaders have been included or excluded from these conversations.

  • A Brave New World: Social Networking Chronicles at the Book Pavilion - Young authors will share strategies for effectively utilizing social networking sites for benefit while avoiding the potential liabilities to personal and professional aspirations.

  • The Black Party BPX 2.0: In RETROspect-Emerging leaders will network and mingle on board of the Odyssey for the second installment of the Black Party Xperience (BPX 2.0).

http://cbcfinc.org/home.html

 


School of Education receives $1 Million from NSF to Study HBCU Production of African American Science and Math Teachers

Noguera

Dr. Kimberly Freeman, assistant professor in the Department of Human Development and Psychoeducational Studies, was awarded $1 million for a three-year education research grant from the National Science Foundation.  The aim of What Works in Producing African American Science and Math Teachers at HBCUs is to discover those factors influencing HBCU’s production of African-American PK-12 science and math teachers.  The multi-method investigation includes case studies of science and math teacher education programs at HBCUs; interviews of current African-American science and math teachers who are recent graduates of HBCUs; and, a longitudinal survey of a freshman cohort of science and math majors at an HBCU.  Dr. Freeman expects the investigation to yield data that can be used to strengthen science and math teacher preparation programs at HBCU’s; improve recruitment of prospective science and math teachers; and inform higher education policy.  Without replenishing the supply of highly-qualified African-American science and math teachers, the continuation of future cohorts of African-American scientists and mathematicians is in jeopardy.  Dr. Freeman believes, “Equipped with reliable scientific information, HBCUs can take a leadership role in becoming major suppliers of African-American science and math educators.”


Howard University School of Education Receives $2.1 Million
Grant from the U.S. Department of Education to Train Teachers

The U.S. Department of Education has awarded $2.1 million for 41 grants through the Transition to Teaching program. The program was designed to increase the pool of qualified teachers in high-need schools in high-need districts by recruiting nontraditional teacher candidates, preparing them through alternative routes to certification, and retaining them through strong mentoring programs. "Nothing helps a child learn as much as a great teacher," said U .S. Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings who recently announced the grant.

According to HUSOE dean Leslie Fenwick, “The $2.1 million award funds HUSOE’s Ready to Teach (R2T) Program, an alternative certification program designed to diversify the nation’s teaching force which is only about 8% African American, 4% Hispanic, and less than 1% Asian. R2T will focus on recruiting and preparing a diverse population of nontraditional teacher candidates and will have a special focus on cultivating African-American male teachers.”

HUSOE was one of three award recipients in the DC area.  American University and the American Board for Certification of Teacher Excellence were also awarded.

 


School of Education Hosts  2nd Annual Capitol Hill  Policy Forum

capitol_smallThe School of Education hosted its Second Annual Capitol Hill Policy Forum April 22-24, 2010. This year, the HUSOE collaborated with the Coalition for Schools Educating Boys of Color (COSEBOC) and the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation (CBCF) for a day at the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill. The convening extended to Howard University’s campus where the School of Education hosted COSEBOC’s  Fourth Annual Gathering of Leaders. The theme of the 2010 convening was Re-imagining Schools for Boys and Young Men of Color. Nearly 300 educators and legislators attended the convening which garnered the support of Congressman Bobby Scott (D-VA) and Danny Davis (D-IL). Dean Fenwick views the convening as “an indicator of the School of Education’s commitment to engaging and leading the national policy conversation about the education of Black, brown and poor children.”


 

ReaDesignSchool of Education Students Help Build School Libraries

The School of Education has partnered with The Heart of America Foundation to redesign libraries in urban schools and communities. Project READesign is the foundation's signature work and has been featured on the Oprah Winfrey Show. Recently, School of Education students traveled to cities around the U.S. (including Los Angeles, Riverside, Santa Ana, Bronx, St. Louis, Milwaukee, and Minneapolis) to donate books and transform school and community spaces into functional libraries and reading corners for elementary school kids. According to Marquis Smith, President of the HUSOE student council, "The experiences we have on these READesigns are priceless! The joy and smiles on the faces of the children and administrators is something that will never get old. Dean Fenwick says, "HUSOE students are making a real difference by encouraging reading and literacy in the nation's urban schools and communities."


whitehouseFenwick and Irvine Present Framing Paper at USDEd

WASHINGTON (August 7, 2009) -- Dr. Jacqueline Jordan Irvine, Visiting Scholar in Urban Education at the Howard University School of Education, and Dean Leslie Fenwick were invited to write and present the framing paper for a conversation about teaching and teacher education in the new millennium to an audience convened by
The White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities and The National Policy Board for Professional Teaching Standards. The convening opened with remarks from Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, and was attended by HBCU presidents and deans of Schools/Colleges of Education, as well as, the presidents of The American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE), The National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), and The Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC). To read the framing paper go to http://www.ed.gov/about/inits/list/whhbcu/hbcu-role.doc


HU School of Education hosts Capitol Hill Policy Forum

capitol_smallWASHINGTON (April 24) – More than 200 Congressional representatives and educators from across the nation met Friday on Capitol Hill under the leadership of the Howard University School of Education, the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, and the Open Society Institute to find ways to bolster education and social outcomes for African American males.

“The School of Education must have a leading voice in the nation’s discourse about education. It is critically important that our faculty’s research informs and influences education funding and policy decision making, particularly as each affects Black, brown and poor children,” Leslie T. Fenwick, Ph.D., Dean of the Howard University School of Education,

The conference, “Breaking Barriers: A Brain Trust for Educational Policy Reform for School-age African American Males” highlighted the groundbreaking research of Ivory Toldson, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Education. During the three-hour forum, experts provided revisions to the No Child Left Behind Act and offered recommendations to the education funding provisions outlined in President Obama’s American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.

Shawn Dove, who manages the Open Society Institute’s Campaign for Black Male Achievement, said the ultimate goal of the conference was “to develop workable solutions to the challenges that confront Black men and boys.”

Various panelists offered solutions to what they perceive as pressing problems.

Derek Black, a professor at Howard University School of Law, said there needs to be a better distribution of funds for public education.

“We must revise the No Child Left Behind Act,” Black said. “Congress should not give any money to any state or school district before doing the necessary background research. The spending quotients are unfair.”

Black also insisted that the government invest more money into early childhood education.

“It’s harder to catch up,” he said. “A student in high school would have a harder time adjusting to new teaching methods and programs, as opposed to a child who has been receiving the proper education tools since kindergarten.”

Floyd Weatherspoon, a professor at Capital University Law School just outside Columbus, Ohio, cited the need for better academic tracking of black male students.

“Many schools are not keeping adequate track of these students’ performance,” Weatherspoon said. “Schools need staff specifically devoted to making sure that African American male students do not fall through the academic safety net.”

Other speakers maintained that black families must to be more involved in the lives of black male children and to have higher educational expectations for them. Additionally, government needs to be more supportive of parents, helping them hold the boys in their families to high standards, they said.

-- Aaron Coad from the Howard University News Service penned this report.


A. Barry Rand Endows $1 Million Scholarship in the School of Education

randf_smallerIn 1999, Addison Barry Rand, a former Fortune 500 executive and the current chairman of Howard University's Board of Trustees, endowed a $1 million  scholarship fund in his mother's name for the School of Education. According to Rand, the Helen Matthews Rand Endowed Scholarship was established in recognition of his late mother's distinguished career and dedication to urban education and community service. Mrs. Rand, a graduate of the esteemed Miner Teachers College, was  a teacher and a principal in DC Pubic Schools for more than two decades.

The Helen Matthews Rand Endowed Scholarship Fund is having an important impact on the availability of highly qualified teachers serving in urban schools. To date, the scholarship fund  has prepared twenty-four (27) teachers. These "best and brightest" are teaching in the nation's public schools.  Five (5) of the teachers are males.

The scholarship provides a $15,000 annual award and a laptop for a maximum of two years to exceptional students pursuing a degree in teacher education. Recipients must make a 2-year commitment to teaching in an inner-city or urban environment directly upon completing their HUSOE degree. Applicants must pursue a course of study leading to a career in teaching grades PK-12. Rand Teacher Scholars are announced each April. The deadline for applications is March 1st, 2009, for the 2009-2010 academic year.

Helen Matthews Rand Endowed Scholarship Application (2009-10)
Click here to view a 1 page Microsoft Word (XP) file

Helen Matthews Rand Endowed Scholarship Application (2009-10)
Click here to view a 1 page PDF file for printing
(Input data will only be saved in Adobe Acrobat)

Helen Matthews Rand Endowed Scholarship Recommendation Form (2009-10)
Click here to view a 1 page Microsoft Word (XP) file

Helen Matthews Rand Endowed Scholarship Recommendation Form (2009-10)
Click here to view a 1 page PDF file for printing
(Input data will only be saved in Adobe Acrobat)

 


School of Education Programs Receive National Recognition

WASHINGTON (August 27, 2008) -- The School of Education’s Early Childhood and Elementary Education programs have recently earned national recognition from the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) and the Association of Childhood Education International (AECI), respectively.


National recognition of teacher preparation programs granted by Specialized Professional Associations surpasses the requirements for accreditation. Nationally recognized programs have met the highest and most rigorous evidence-based standards articulated by discipline-based professional organizations.


Dr. Leslie T. Fenwick, Dean of the School of Education, attributes this historic accolade to the hard work of the faculty and exceptional students.


“This is a first for the School of Education. Though the School of Education is NCATE accredited and our preparation programs are approved by the state, the School has never had national recognized programs,” Fenwick said. “We are delighted that NAEYC and AECI have affirmed the rigor and value of our teacher preparation programs.”


The mission of the Howard University School of Education is to prepare teachers, administrators, researchers, program evaluators, and human development professionals for leadership in urban and diverse educational settings. The school through its faculty and research works tirelessly to influence the national education agenda for African American children and triumphs the thrust that all students can learn.


School of Education receives $1 Million from NSF to Study HBCU Production of African American Science and Math Teachers

Noguera

Dr. Kimberly Freeman, assistant professor in the Department of Human Development and Psychoeducational Studies, was awarded $1 million for a three-year education research grant from the National Science Foundation.  The aim of What Works in Producing African American Science and Math Teachers at HBCUs is to discover those factors influencing HBCU’s production of African-American PK-12 science and math teachers.  The multi-method investigation includes case studies of science and math teacher education programs at HBCUs; interviews of current African-American science and math teachers who are recent graduates of HBCUs; and, a longitudinal survey of a freshman cohort of science and math majors at an HBCU.  Dr. Freeman expects the investigation to yield data that can be used to strengthen science and math teacher preparation programs at HBCU’s; improve recruitment of prospective science and math teachers; and inform higher education policy.  Without replenishing the supply of highly-qualified African-American science and math teachers, the continuation of future cohorts of African-American scientists and mathematicians is in jeopardy.  Dr. Freeman believes, “Equipped with reliable scientific information, HBCUs can take a leadership role in becoming major suppliers of African-American science and math educators.”


The 28th Annual Charles H. Thompson Lecture-Colloquium
Series will be held on November 7th featuring Dr. Pedro Noguera

Noguera

For nearly 30 years, the Journal of Negro Education and the School of Education have co-sponsored the Charles H. Thompson Lecture Series. On November 7, 2007 one of the nation’s leading sociologists, Dr. Pedro Noguera, will present the colloquium’s keynote address, “The Significance of Race in the Racial Achievement Gap.”

Dr. Noguera is a professor at the Steinhardt School of Education at New York University, co-director of the Institute for the Study of Globalization and Education in Metropolitan Settings, and director of the Metropolitan Center for Urban Education.  Dr. Noguera’s research focuses on the ways in which schools are influenced by social and economic conditions in the urban environment.  A prolific writer and editor, Noguera has just released, Unfinished Business: Closing the Racial Achievement Gap in our Schools as well as, hundreds of other research articles on issues of racial inequality, diversity in the nation’s schools, and educational reform.

Dr. Charles H. Thompson, founder of the Journal of Negro Education, chairman of the Department of Education, dean of the College of Liberal Arts, and dean of the Graduate School, inspired this lecture series initiated in 1980 by the Editorial/Advisory Board of the Journal of Negro Education, under the sponsorship of the Howard University School of Education. The Lecture-Colloquium is held annually and seeks to continue the systematic exploration of the wide-ranging issues and problems relating to the education of African Americans and ethnic minorities, to which Dr. Thompson dedicated his laudable career.

Dr. Noguera’s address will be delivered on November 7th, 2007 at 5:00 PM in the School of Business Auditorium.  A reception will follow in the Blackburn Center Gallery Lounge. 


A. Barry Rand Endows $1 Million Scholarship in the School of Education


RAND_appA. Barry Rand, a former Fortune 500 executive and the current chairman of Howard University’s Board of Trustees, endowed a scholarship fund in his mother’s name for the Howard University School of Education (HUSOE). According to Rand, the Helen Matthews Rand Endowed Scholarship was established in recognition of his late mother’s distinguished career and dedication to urban education and community service. Mrs. Rand, a graduate of the esteemed Miner Teachers College, was a teacher and a principal in DC Public Schools for more than two decades.

The scholarship provides a $15,000 annual award and a laptop for a maximum of two years to exceptional students pursuing a degree in teacher education. Recipients must make a 2-year commitment to teaching in an inner-city or urban environment directly upon completing their HUSOE degree. Applicants must pursue a course of study leading to a career in teaching grades PK-12. Rand Teacher Scholars are announced each April. The deadline for applications is February 15th, 2008, for the 2008-2009 academic year.

Helen Matthews Rand Endowed Scholarship Application (2007-08)
Click here to view a 2 page Microsoft Word (XP) file

Helen Matthews Rand Endowed Scholarship Application (2007-08)
Click here to view a 2 page PDF file for printing
(Input data will only be saved in Adobe Acrobat)

Helen Matthews Rand Endowed Scholarship Recommendation Form (2007-08)
Click here to view a 1 page Microsoft Word (XP) file

Helen Matthews Rand Endowed Scholarship Recommendation Form (2007-08)
Click here to view a 1 page PDF file for printing
(Input data will only be saved in Adobe Acrobat)


Howard University School of Education Receives $2.1 Million Grant from the U.S. Department of Education to Train Teachers

The U.S. Department of Education has awarded $22.1 million for 41 grants through the Transition to Teaching program. The program was designed to increase the pool of qualified teachers in high-need schools in high-need districts by recruiting nontraditional teacher candidates, preparing them through alternative routes to certification, and retaining them through strong mentoring programs. "Nothing helps a child learn as much as a great teacher," said U .S. Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings who recently announced the grant.

According to HUSOE dean Leslie Fenwick, “The $2.1 million award funds HUSOE’s Ready to Teach (R2T) Program, an alternative certification program designed to diversify the nation’s teaching force which is only about 8% African American, 4% Hispanic, and less than 1% Asian. R2T will focus on recruiting and preparing a diverse population of nontraditional teacher candidates and will have a special focus on cultivating African-American male teachers.”

HUSOE was one of three award recipients in the DC area.  American University and the American Board for Certification of Teacher Excellence were also awarded.


School of Education Students Selected as Rockefeller Brothers Fund Fellows
Students

Howard University juniors Nicole Golden, Ayesha Jeter, and Norma Rosa, have been awarded the 2007 Rockefeller Brothers Fund’s (RBF) Fellowships for Aspiring Teachers of Color. Each Fellow receives up to $22,100 over a five-year period that begins this summer and ends after completion of three years of public school teaching. This year's selection process was unusually competitive said Dr. Leslie T. Fenwick, Dean of the School of Education. "Howard University and Brown University were the only institutions to have each of their applicants accepted as Fellows," Fenwick added. "I am proud that these young women -- who represent our best and brightest -- have chosen to pursue the high calling of teaching."

Fellows are required to complete a summer project between their junior and senior years. Planned jointly by Fellows and their mentors, the projects provide students with direct teaching experience with children or youth. Projects are presented at a summer workshop, which will be held this year from August 2-5 in the Washington, D.C. area.

Established in 1991, the Fellowships for Aspiring Teachers of Color initiative is a key component of the Charles E. Culpeper Human Advancement program. The Fellowship recognizes the vitally important role of education in human advancement and seeks to increase the number of highly qualified teachers of color in K-12 public education in the United States. For more about the 2007 Fellows and the Fellowships for Aspiring Teachers of Color, visit www.rbf.org.


Dr. Bill Cosby Visits the School of Education

Dr Cosby and Dr. FenwickThe School of Education hosted the 26th Annual Conference of the Research Association for Minority Professors (RAMP). Dr. Bill Cosby was the keynote speaker for the conference’s opening session. Dr. Marilyn Irving, associate professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction in the School of Education, served as the past president of RAMP and explained that the conference theme, “The Plight of the African American Male in the 21st Century:  Overcoming Odds and Adversities,” was designed to present research and commentary about improving life chances for African American males. Conference presenters included Dr. A. Wade Boykin of the CAPSTONE Institute (formerly the Center for Research on Students Placed at Risk, CRESPAR) and Dr. George McKenna, noted educator and subject of the award-winning CBS movie, The George McKenna Story, starring Denzel Washington.

One month after the conference, Dr. Cosby returned to visit with School of Education student teacher candidates for “Teacher Talk,” a roundtable discussion about intervention strategies for underperforming and troubled PK-12 students.

RAMP will hold its 27th Annual Conference February 7-9 in Houston, Texas. The theme will be “Education & Healthcare: Approaches To Bridge The Gap In Disparities For Minority Populations.”


Doctoral Student Honored with a Washington Post Distinguished Educational Leadership Award

Mr. Wayne Ryan, Principal of Crosby S. Noyes Elementary School, is currently enrolled in the EAGLE Program in the Department of Educational Leadership in the School of Education.  EAGLE is the acronym for Educational Administration Guided Leadership Experience, an inter-professional executive doctoral program leading to the EdD degree. An alumnus of Howard University’s School of Law, Mr. Ryan is credited with leading Noyes Elementary School into a new era of academic achievement.