Research Showcase

Dr. Toldson Appointed by President Obama

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On September 12, 2013,  President Barack Obama named Dr. lvory A. Toldson, associate professor of counseling psychology in the School of Education, deputy director of the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).  Click here to read a sampling of news stories featuring Dr. Toldson.

WHITE HOUSE BLOG
President Obama Names New Leadership to the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2013/09/12/president-obama-names-new-leadership-white-house-initiative-historically-black-colle

THE ROOT
New Leadership for Obama's HBCU Initiative http://www.theroot.com/blogs/blogging-beltway/new-leadership-obamas-hbcu-initiative

INSIGHT NEWS
Obama names leadership for HBCU Initiative http://www.insightnews.com/news/11286-obama-names-leadership-for-hbcu-initiative

INSIDE HIGHER ED
Advocate for Black Colleges
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2013/09/13/new-leader-selected-white-house-office-historically-black-colleges

CHRONICLE
New Leader of White House Initiative on HBCUs Comes With Controversial Past http://chronicle.com/article/New-Leader-of-White-House/141605/#sthash.LlIm42gM.dpuf


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Dr. Vinetta Jones featured in Washington Post

Heroes in the war against dummy math
By Jay Mathews, Published: December 2

 

As a 13-year-old African American in 1954, Vinetta Jones knew the exasperating letdown of people thinking she was not capable of doing whatever it was she wanted to do. Yet it was still a shock when she, an accomplished math student, walked into her all-white Detroit junior high class on the first day of Algebra I and the teacher asked what she was doing there.

“This is my class,” Jones said. The teacher said: “There must be a mistake. You wouldn’t be able to keep up.”

Forced to take Jones, the teacher never called on her even though she got an A on every test. Jones would earn a doctorate in educational psychology from the University of California at Berkeley, become an education school dean and run statewide reform programs in California and North Carolina. With $32 million from College Board benefactors in the 1990s, she led a program that broke the back of U.S. schools’ resistance to letting minorities, poor kids and other allegedly ill-prepared students take algebra and geometry.

Jones, a Howard University professor and a former dean of its education school, lives in Prince George’s County. With support and guidance from Montgomery County resident Sol H. Pelavin, until recently president of the Washington-based American Institutes for Research, she and thousands of educators proved that remedial math was largely a waste the way it was taught, that good teaching of algebra and geometry was better. Their Equity 2000 program is the subject of my short new book, “The War Against Dummy Math: How Seven School Districts Changed U.S. Education by Embracing Algebra for All.”

http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/education/heroes-in-war-against-dummy-math/2012/12/02/8a42b2f2-3aab-11e2-b01f-5f55b193f58f_print.html


Dr. Ivory Toldson Selected Diverse Issues Emerging Scholar

itoldsonDr. Ivory Toldson, associate professor in the Department of Human Development and Psychoeducational Studies, was selected as one of 12 rising academic stars who have emerged as national leaders in their respective disciplines. He is featured in the January 2013 issue of Diverse Issues in Higher Education. Dr. Toldson’s research about African American school-aged males has been widely disseminated and seeks to interrupt the cycle of negative reporting in research and media outlets about this population. To read more about Dr. Toldson in Diverse Issues go to the digital version of the magazine, page 17 at: http://mydigimag.rrd.com/publication/?i=140845.


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Dr. Ladson-Billings Delivers Thompson Lecture in November: “Stakes is High:” Educating New Century Students

Although most of the education establishment seems fixated on what it terms the “achievement gap,” few are looking carefully at the changing needs of this century’s African American students. The combination of technology and globalization situate them to make significant contributions in every field of endeavor yet schools continue to insist on a 19th century curriculum and instructional model. In this talk Dr. Ladson-Billings will address the way new technologies and hip hop culture are helping to write new academic narratives that capture the hopes and imagination of a new generation.

Gloria Ladson-Billings is the Kellner Family Chair in Urban Education in the Department of Curriculum & Instruction and faculty affiliate in the departments of Educational Policy Studies, Afro American Studies, and the African Studies Program at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Ladson-Billings currently serves as the Interim Assistant Vice Provost and Director of the Chancellors and Powers-Knapp Scholars Program. She is a former president of the American Educational Research Association (2005-2006) and a member of the National Academy of Education. She has published 8 books and over 100 journal articles and book chapters. Her work focuses on Culturally Relevant Pedagogy and Critical Race Theory applications to education.

The 33rd Annual Charles Thompson Lecture-Colloquium was held on Wednesday, November 7th, 2012 at 5:00PM  in the Blackburn Center ballroom. The Charles Thompson Lecture-Colloquium is jointly sponsored by the Howard University School of Education and the Journal of Negro Education, the School’s seminal research quarterly now in its 80th year of continuous publication as a refereed journal devoted to issues incident to the education of Black people.


capitolDean Fenwick Appears on Washington Watch

Leslie Fenwick, Ph.D., dean of the Howard University School of Education, appeared on "Washington Watch with Roland Martin" on Sunday, Oct. 9. "Washington Watch" presents news, political analysis, and commentary on contemporary issues facing the African American community and the nation. Along with Judith Browne-Dianis, co-director of the Advancement Project,  Dean Fenwick discussed President Obama’s and Mr. Romney’s higher education policies and proposals.

To watch the program go to: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=FzboXKznoFY#


bookcover

 

Faculty Write Books about President Obama and Other Leadership/Policy Topics

HUSOE faculty authored, co-authored, or were contributing authors to the following recently released books:

  • Through Children’s Eyes: President Obama and the Future Generation, Drs. Helen Bond, Fang Wu, and Izolda Fotiyeva
  • The Sumner Story, Dr. Wilma Bonner, Director of Teacher Education, Department of Curriculum and Instruction
  • Breaking Barriers 2: Plotting the Path Away from Juvenile Detention and Toward Academic Success for School-age African American Males, Dr. Ivory Toldson
  • Women of Color in Higher Education, Dr. Vinetta Jones, Professor, Department of Curriculum and Instruction
  • Turnaround Leadership: Deans of Color as Change Agents, Dr. Leslie T. Fenwick, Dean

Dr. Helen Bond Presents on Social Media at the University of Cambridge

hbondDr. Helen Bond of Education and Dr. Alem Hailu of African Studies were invited to present a scholarly paper that focused on an interdisciplinary course they developed as part of the Mellon Interdisciplinary Initiative at Howard University at The University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom. The conference was entitled, Beyond Revolutions: the Use of ICTs for Political Mobilization and Participation in Sub-Saharan Africa.Dr. Hailu and Dr. Bond participated in the Mellon Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Research Program in July 2011 at Howard University.  As a result of their collaboration they developed a unique and interesting interdisciplinary course called "Social Media and Political Change in the African World.” This course examines the connections between youth, education, and revolutions in technology and transformations in politics in Africa and the larger world. They were invited to participate by Dr. Iginio Gagliardone of the Centre for Governance and Human Rights at the University of Cambridge. The Conference Report can be found at /cghr/docs/CGHR_Beyond_revolutions_conference_report.pdf


Dean Fenwick Weighs In On Office of Civil Rights Database

lfenwickOn March 6, 2012 Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and Assistant Secretary of Education for the Office of Civil Rights Russlyn Ali held a press conference at Howard University to unveil the department's new education civil rights database which contains data about education disparities. This database provides significant tools to address longstanding educational inequities. President Sidney Ribeau opened the occasion and Dean Fenwick followed with framing remarks. The event continues to air in its entirety on C-SPAN: http://www.c-spanvideo.org/program/Disparitie.


Department of Public History and HUSOE Host Lecture about Swann Case

swannCivil rights pioneers, Rev. Dr. Darius Swann and Mrs. Vera Poe Swann discussed how requesting that their son be transferred to a school closer to home resulted in a landmark education and civil rights court case, Swann V. Charlotte Mecklenberg (1971). The panel discussion was held on Tuesday, February 14, 2012 in the Browsing Room of Founders Library.


Dr. Ivory Toldson Receives MLK Day Brotherhood Award from NewsOne

itoldson

The MLK Day Brotherhood Awards are NewsOne’s annual celebration of five important Americans who are continuing the work of Martin Luther King, Jr. — especially in the realm of interpersonal, cross-racial, and cross-ethnic understanding.

Dr. Toldson is one of the 2012 honorees.

http://newsone.com/category/nation/black-history-month/brotherhood-awards/


Dean Fenwick Briefs U.S. Senate

c_brownDean Fenwick was an invited panelist for a U.S. Senate Briefing,  Student Access to Prepared and Effective Teachers:  Understanding the Impact of Federal Policy, held on December 8, 2011 The panel features key policy advocates and/or organizational presidents from the following organizations: the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund; the Rural School and Community Trust, the National Center for Learning Disabilities (NCLD) and the Schott Foundation. Click this link to watch the video:

http://sanders.senate.gov/newsroom/news/?id=d85d2f37-33ed-4796-800b-46ccd6161cea


Dr. Middleton Awarded Salzburg Global Fellowship

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Dr. Kyndra Middleton, assistant professor in Human Development and Psychoeducational Studies in the School of Education, was awarded a fellowship through the Mellon Foundation to represent Howard University at the Salzburg Global Seminar in Salzburg, Austria which took place December 6, 2011 through December 11, 2011. The seminar session, entitled "Optimizing Talent: Closing Educational and Social Mobility Gaps Worldwide," included 63 participants from 24 countries who discussed a variety of problems faced in their countries that contribute to the educational and social mobility gaps. The group was comprised of university professors, current and former ministers of education, children’s rights advocates, and other educational stakeholders. Dr. Middleton joins the more than 21,000 individuals from around the world as a prestigious Salzburg Global Fellow and is now invited to actively and aggressively participate in advocating for educational equity globally.


Dr. Stills Selected as Counselor Educator of the Year

harrison-jones Dr. Aaron B. Stills, chair and associate professor in the Department of Human Development and Psychoeducational Studies, was selected as the Counselor Educator of the Year by the D.C. Counseling Association. Dr. Stills is also the founding president of the National Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development, a division of the American Counseling Association.


Dr. M. Christopher Brown, II Delivers Thompson Lecture

c_brownThe 31st Annual Charles Thompson Lecture-Colloquium will be held on Wednesday, November 9, 2011 at 5:00PM  in the Blackburn Center ballroom. The Charles Thompson Lecture-Colloquium is jointly sponsored by the Howard University School of Education and the Journal of Negro Education, the School’s seminal research quarterly now in its 79th year of continuous publication as a refereed journal devoted to issues incident to the education of Black people.

Dr. M. Christopher Brown, II will deliver this year’s lecture. A preeminent scholar whose published research examines the history and honors the role of HBCUs in American higher education, Dr. Brown is the newly appointed president of Alcorn State University. Dr. Brown is author, contributing author or editor of the following books: The Broken Cisterns of African American Education: Academic Performance and Achievement in the Post-Brown Era; Black Colleges: New Perspectives on Policy and Practice; and The Children Hurricane Katrina Left Behind: Schooling Context, Professional Preparation and Community Politics.


Dr. Helen Bond Named 2011 Fulbright Scholar

bondDr. Helen Bond, assistant professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction was selected as a 2011 Fulbright-Nehru Lecturer and will teach at the Sri Ramakrishna Mission Vidyalaya College of Education during spring semester 2012. Dr. Bond's research focuses on the internationalization of teacher education and the integration of instructional technology in teacher education. She is a contributing author to the recently released text, Through Children's Eyes: President Obama and the Future Generation co-authored with HUSOE colleagues Drs. Fang Wu and Izolda Fotiyeva along with Bernadine Barr, and a contributing author to Paths to Teaching the Holocaust.


At CBC Forum Dean Says No to Teach for America

fenwickIn a Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) forum about reducing the black-white achievement gap, Dean Leslie T. Fenwick discussed strategies for increasing urban poor students’ opportunity to learn. She highlighted statistics revealing that schools which serve black poor students are less likely to be staffed by fully certified teachers and experience high turnover rates among teachers and principals. According to Fenwick, Teach for America (TFA) adds to the concentration of under-qualified teachers and the churn of professionals in and out of these schools. The American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education news stream highlights Fenwick’s remarks at: http://diverseeducation.com/article/16427/


School of Education Lecture Features Noted Author

jacksonThe School of Education’s District of Columbia Area Writing Project (DCAWP) is sponsoring a lecture by Dr. Yvette Jackson who will discuss her recently released book, The Pedagogy of Confidence. Dr. Jackson who is a visiting lecturer at Harvard University serves as CEO of the National Urban Alliance for Effective Education which was founded at the College Board and Teachers College, Columbia University. Jackson is a visiting lecturer at Harvard University. Her new book provides practical approaches to rekindle educators’ belief in their ability to inspire the vast capacity of urban students. The book talk and reception is today, October 20, 2011, 6:00pm-7:30 pm in the Blackburn Center’s Gallery Lounge.


HUSOE Hosts Constitution Day Lecture

September 22, 2011
6:00pm to 7:00pm
School of Education Building, ASA Room 130

irussellThis year, the HUSOE is hosting one of the University’s Constitution Day lectures. Noted scholar, Dr. Russell Irvine, will present his recently released book, The African American Quest for Higher Education Before the Civil War. In reviewing the book, history professor Ronald Butchart of the University of Georgia notes, “Irvine has given us more original insights into the history of education than I have seen in the scholarship of the last decade. Most of our colleagues are revising old narratives and revealing new details along the way; Irvine has opened an entirely new frontier filled with new actors. He has given us new leverage on early black education that is refreshing and exciting.” ­ Join the HUSOE at the School of Education Building, ASA Room 130 from 6:00pm to 7:00pm with a book signing following. RSVP to ggrandison@howard.edu as seating is limited.


Dean Appointed to National Academy of Sciences Committee for District of Columbia Public Schools Study

ltfenwick The National Research Council (NRC), a division of the National Academy of Sciences, recently released a study of Washington DC Public Schools, A Plan for Evaluating the District of Columbia's Public Schools: From Impressions to Evidence. The report offers first impressions of school reform under the public education reform amendment act (PERAA) and notes that the city and DCPS have made a good-faith effort to implement the required changes, but the committee cautions that it is premature to draw general conclusions about the reform's effectiveness. The report emphasizes that a comprehensive evaluation of DCPS should be long-term and independent and concludes by offering a framework for evaluating the extent to which PERAA is impacting the core conditions for learning that influence student outcomes.

Dean Fewick was a member of the 12-person Committee producing the report. Led by Michal Feuer, dean of the George Washington University College of Education and past director of the NRC, other members included co-chairs Christopher Edley, dean of the Bolt School of Law at the University of California-Berkeley and Bob Houser, NRC director and professor emeritus University of Wisconsin-Madison; as well as, Beatrice F. Birman, managing research scientist at the American Institutes of Research; Carl A. Cohn, professor of urban school leadership at Claremont Graduate University and former superintendent of the Long Beach State Unified School District; Jon Fullerton, executive director of Harvard University's Center for Education Policy Research; Fernando A. Guerra, director of health, San Antonio Metropolitan Health Department; Jonathan Guevarra, CEO of the Community College of the District of Columbia; Jonathan Guryan, professor of economics at the University of Chicago; Lorraine M. McDonnell, professor of political science at the University of California Santa Barbara; C. Kent McGuire, President of the Southern Education Fund and past dean of the Temple University College of Education; Maxine F. Singer, Carnegie Institution of Washington; William F. Tate, professor and director of Washington University's Center for the Study of Regional Competitiveness in Science and Technology. To obtain a copy of the report go to http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=13114.


Toldson's Research Provides New Hope for Black Love and Marriage

itoldsonDr. Ivory Toldson, associate professor of counseling psychology in the Department of Human Development and Psychoeducational Studies and editor-in-chief of the Journal of Negro Education, has recently published a study contradicting recent features on ABC Nightline and the Wall Street Journal asserting that there is a shortage of available black men and that educated black women have a slim chance of getting married.  Toldson and his co-author Bryant Marks, Ph.D. identify flaws in the analysis of this data and provide hope for black love and marriage, which may not be as endangered as the national news media portray.  Marks is the director of the Morehouse Male Initiative, assistant professor of psychology at Morehouse College, and faculty associate at the Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan.  Together, they shatter widely held myths about black men, black women and their relationships.  Are there enough successful black men for the black women who want them?  Do black people have unstable marriage patterns because of forced breeding and family separations during slavery?  Are most successful black men gay or prefer to be with white women?  These are some of the questions that they address in their article published by empower news magazine,  an online magazine that offers commentary and articles on social, economical, health, political, educational and environmental issues facing people of African descent. Read the article at http://www.empowernewsmag.com/listings.php?article=2051


Department Hosts Educational Leadership Forum

EAPforumThe Department of Educational Administration and Policy (EAP) at Howard University is celebrating 10 years of doctoral education in education leadership.  In collaboration with the Howard University chapter of Phi Delta Kappa and the Graduate Student Advisory Council, we hosted a leadership forum entitled, “Leadership Preparation Beyond the Classroom.”  This conversation on education leadership from scholar practitioners allowed students to query about ways to obtain a position at the building, district and state levels.  Additionally, given the high rate of turnover in education leadership valuable information was provided on maintaining and thriving in the position.  Pictured from left to right are: Mr. Terrence Yarborough (Principal, Fairfax County, VA),  Dr. Gloria Grantham (Superintendent, Pleasantville, NJ), Dr. Sean Yisrael (Principal, DCPS), Dr. Constance Clark-Snead (Superintendent, Westbury, NY), Dr. Nicole Clifton (Principal, DCPS), Dr. Yvonne Brandon (Superintendent, Richmond VA), and Dr. Marcus Newsome (Superintendent, Chesterfield, VA).


Toldson's Research Shatters Myths about Black Males and College Attendance

toldsonCellblock vs. College
A million reasons there are more Black men in college than in prison and why more work needs to be done
Wednesday, April 20, 2011 By Ivory A. Toldson and Janks Morton


http://www.empowernewsmag.com/listings.php?article=1890

 


HUSOE Designated by Woodrow Wilson Foundation

WWFThe HUSOE was selected by the Woodrow Wilson Foundation as one of 27 Schools/Colleges of Education having quality, distinctive teacher preparation programs. Nearly 160 Schools/Colleges of Education were reviewed for this designation through a competitive application process.

In announcing the selected institutions, the WWF stated that the designated colleges/universities have "high quality teacher preparation programs. These institutions have developed bold, innovative approaches that can prepare teachers for a time in which the nation's K-12 schools are undergoing dramatic change."

The HUSOE is among a cohort of participating graduate programs which also includes: University of Michigan, University of Pennsylvania, Stanford University, UCLA, New York University, University of Virginia and the University of Chicago-Urban Education Institute among others.

Woodrow Wilson-Rockefeller Brothers Fund Aspiring Teacher Fellows will be able to use their $30,000 fellowship to earn a master's degree in a teaching field at the HUSOE or one of the other designated institutions.


Dr. Marilyn Irving Honored as Top Researcher

mirvingDr. Marilyn Irving, Associate Dean for Research and Sponsored Programs and a professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, was honored as one of six of the University's most productive grantswriters. Those honored have maintained a 10-year consecutive history of funded grants. Presently, Dr. Irving is the co-principal investigator of the HUSOE's Ready to Teach Program, a $2.1 million award from the U.S. Department of Education.


Student Elected as First African-American on NERA Graduate Students Issues Committee

AEllisAntonio Ellis, a doctoral scholar in Educational Administration and Policy in the Howard University School of Education, was elected to serve on the Graduate Students Issues Committee for the Northeastern Educational Researchers Association (NERA). He is the first HBCU/African American student to be elected to this committee. His research interests include Critical Race Theory in Education and Overrepresented Populations in Special Education (SPED). We congratulate this scholar for his research in the field of education and contribution to the improved achievement of all students. To view the latest NERA newsletter with article on Mr. Ellis (pg. 19), click here.


Alumnus Leads Top-100 High School

jpcadetFor the fourth year in a row, Oxon Hill High School in the Prince George's County School System is listed in Newsweek Magazine as one of the nation's top-100 high schools. The high school earned this designation under the leadership of Principal Jean-Paul Cadet. Dr. Cadet is a recent graduate of the doctoral program in the Department of Educational Administration and Policy in the School of Education. Notably, the school's standardized test data show that African American students consistently perform at levels equivalent to or higher than other populations of students. Dr. Cadet is credited with the "turn around" leadership that has resulted in students' academic gains.


Dr. Bonner Discusses New Book on NPR

bonnerDr. Wilma Bonner, Director of Teacher Education, is co-author of the Sumner Story. The just released book is a history of the famed all-Black High School (in Kansas City, KS) prior to desegregation. Known for its exceptionally credentialed principals and faculty and high-achieving graduates, Sumner High School's more than 70 year record of success stands as a testament to what can be achieved in the nation's public schools. Go to http://www.thesumnerstory2010.com for more information about The Sumner Story and click here to hear Dr. Bonner's interview on National Public Radio (NPR).


HUSOE Designated by Woodrow Wilson Foundation

WWFThe HUSOE was selected by the Woodrow Wilson Foundation as one of 27 Schools/Colleges of Education having quality, distinctive teacher preparation programs. Nearly 160 Schools/Colleges of Education were reviewed for this designation through a competitive application process.

In announcing the selected institutions, the WWF stated that the designated colleges/universities have "high quality teacher preparation programs. These institutions have developed bold, innovative approaches that can prepare teachers for a time in which the nation's K-12 schools are undergoing dramatic change."

The HUSOE is among a cohort of participating graduate programs which also includes: University of Michigan, University of Pennsylvania, Stanford University, UCLA, New York University, University of Virginia and the University of Chicago-Urban Education Institute among others.

Woodrow Wilson-Rockefeller Brothers Fund Aspiring Teacher Fellows will be able to use their $30,000 fellowship to earn a master's degree in a teaching field at the HUSOE or one of the other designated institutions.


Doctoral Students Receive National Awards

powellMr. Michael Powell and Mr. Wayne Ryan, doctoral students in the Department of Educational Administration and Policy, are recipients of two national awards. Mr. Powell was selected by the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD) as the 2010 Young Educator of the Year (one of two awarded nationally).  Mr. Wayne Ryan is the recipient of the 2009 U.S. Department of Education Terrel Bell Award for Outstanding School Leadership (one of 8 awarded nationally).

Mr. Wayne Ryan, is principal at the Crosby S. Noyes Education Campus in DC Public Schools. The Terrel H. Bell Award is given to principals by the U. S. Department of Education, together with the National Association of Elementary School Principals, the National Middle Schools Association, and the National Association of Secondary School Principals. The Terrel H. Bell Award, named for the former U.S. Secretary of Education, recognizes outstanding school leaders and the vital role they play in overcoming challenging circumstances. Principals nominated for this award are school leaders committed to fostering successful teaching and learning at their schools. Mr. Ryan was honored as the principal responsible for the turn-around of Noyes from an underperforming school to a Blue Ribbon School. He is known as a collaborative and results-driven administrator who inspires his faculty and staff to do whatever it takes to help their students meet high standards.

Mr. Michael Powell is assistant principal at Patuxent Elementary School in Prince George's County Public Schools, Maryland. The ASCD Young Educator Award is given to a teacher or principal who demonstrates educational leadership in their school, district and community, shows a positive impact on student achievement and illustrates significant contributions to the education community. Mr. Powell's trademark is implementing project-based learning opportunities that help to both increase student achievement and build character. When faced with the challenge of improving his school's math and science scores, for example, he created No Child Left Inside—a program designed to engage students and the broader community in transforming Patuxent into a green school. Through hands-on learning that included testing the pH level of the local stream, creating habitats for local animal species, and maintaining a history trail, students bolstered their science and math skills while contributing to a cleaner and greener community.


Dean Appointed to NASA Advisory Council

fenwickDean Leslie T. Fenwick was recently appointed to the NASA National Advisory Council (NAC) Education and Public Outreach (EPO) Committee. This newly formed committee of 10 individuals was established by NASA Administrator Major General Charles F. Bolden, Jr., NASA's first African American director.   The   Committee is charged with providing the Administrator with recommendations on the nation’s civil space program.


Dr. Jackie Irvine, HUSOE Visiting Scholar Honored

irvineDr. Jacqueline Jordan Irvine, a member of the National Academy of Education and the Charles Howard Candler Professor Emerita at Emory University, was named Visiting Scholar in Urban Education at the Howard University School of Education in January 2009 (and served through December 2009). A nationally recognized scholar who earned her undergraduate and master's degrees at Howard University, Dr. Irvine's published research examines urban education, the teacher pipeline, and culturally responsive pedagogy. Her books include Black Students and School Failure, In Search of Wholeness: African American Teachers and Their Culturally Specific Pedagogy and Culturally Responsive Lesson Planning for Elementary and Middle Grades.

Dr. Irvine is recipient of research, teaching and distinguished career awards from numerous prominent education organizations including the American Educational Research Association (AERA) and the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education (AACTE). In establishing the Visiting Scholar in Urban Education position, Dean Leslie T. Fenwick remarked, "This post and Dr. Irvine's appointment to it signals to the educational policy and research communities that the Howard University School of Education is repositioning itself to assume a more nationally prominent role as it responds to the nation's education challenges." In March, Dr. Irvine was recognized as a 2010 Howard University Charter Day Honoree for outstanding contribution to education and research.


Dean Appointed to George Lucas Education Foundation Board

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Dr. Leslie T. Fenwick, dean of the Howard University School of Education, was appointed to the National Advisory Council for the George Lucas Education Foundation. The founder and chair of the foundation, movie producer George Lucas, established the organization to support innovation in PK-12 schools. The foundation publishes EduTopia a widely recognized magazine for promoting positive change in education. According to Dean Fenwick, "The foundation's vision of creating a new world of learning for the nation's students is compelling and fascinating. This is an opportunity for the Howard University School of Education to contribute to the national converstation about innovation in teaching and learning." Dean Fenwick joins council members from Harvard University, the Panasonic Foundation, Vanderbilt University, distinguished public school leaders, and nonprofit executive directors.


Faculty Member Appointed to NCATE UAB

harrison-jones Dr. Lois Harrison-Jones, interim chair of the Department of Educational Administration and Policy, has been named to a second term on the Unit Advisory Board (UAB) for the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). NCATE's UAB is responsible for determining the accreditation status of professional education units across the nation.


Dean Named to TEAC Board

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Washington (August 14, 2009) -- Leslie T. Fenwick, Ph.D., dean of the School of Education, was recently elected to serve on the Board of Directors for the Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC).

TEAC is one of two accrediting bodies approved by the U.S. Department of Education to accredit all educator preparation programs in the United States. TEAC’s primary work is accrediting undergraduate and graduate professional education programs in order to assure the public about the quality of college and university programs.

“The presence of Howard University’s School of Education on TEAC’s board will advance the goal of continuous improvement in educator preparation and highlight the important role that HBCUs play in preparing competent and caring education professionals for the nation’s schools,” Fenwick said.

The 17-member board includes education professionals in higher education, pre-K through grade 12 schools, and education policy officials from the University of Texas at Austin, the University of Virginia, Michigan State University, Indiana University, the University of Maryland, George Washington University, the Tatnall School, and the Michigan State Department of Education among others.


School Hosts 2008 Fulbright Indigenous Scholar

fulbrightDiabetes is Australia’s fastest-growing chronic disease and the seventh highest cause of death in Australia. Australia’s Indigenous population suffers the fourth highest rate of type 2 diabetes in the world, with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people over 35 years among those at highest risk.”

Christopher Lawrence has received the 2008 Fulbright Indigenous Scholarship sponsored by the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations. He is one of 24 talented Australians to be recognised as a Fulbright Scholar in 2008. Chris is currently a Study Manager at The George Institute for International Health and completing a PhD in epidemiology at the University of Sydney.  Chris, originally from Perth Western Australia, has a Masters in Applied Epidemiology from the Australian National University and has been previously recognised with a European Educational Program in Epidemiology, a Career Development Award and a NHMRC Capacity Building Grant. He has previously worked with the Derbarl Yerrrigan Health Service in Perth and the National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research.

Through his Fulbright Scholarship, Chris initially undertook research at the Brigham Women’s Hospital in Boston, a teaching facility for Harvard’s Medical and Public Health Schools where he received academic mentoring and supervision from within the School of Public Health at Harvard University. In December 2008 Chris transferred to Howard University to work alongside Dr. Angela Ferguson, Associate Professor and Director of the Counselling Psychology Program in the Human Development and Psychoeducational Studies department, School of Education. Chris’ primary research area is focused on designing interventions to reduce the incidence of obesity and onset of type 2 diabetes amongst minority groups. He undertook the opportunity to work with Dr. Ferguson to learn more about and better understand the social, emotional, and sociocultural aspects of risk factors associated with health, health promoting lifestyles and social well being of minority groups affected by obesity and diabetes.

Chris and Dr. Ferguson are currently working on a pilot study to identify risk factors affecting health promoting lifestyles among African American college students. Australian Aboriginal peoples experience epidemic levels of diabetes compared with other Australians and the African American community is disproportionately affected by various chronic disease despite only making up 12.7% of the U.S. population. African Americans and Indigenous/Aboriginal populations share several sociopolitical similarities. This research project serves as a pilot study to assist them in developing a broader, more expansive study that will be conducted in African American communities in which to investigate variables such as food choices, activity level, family messages about food selection, weight, and mixed cultural messages impacting on individual’s informed decision making related to health and nutrition.

To date, no Australian interventions designed to reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes amongst minority groups have been published. Therefore there is limited scientific expertise in this area in Australia. Chris hopes to integrate research findings from his work in the U.S., the methods and techniques employed by American scientists, the use of positive psychology as a motivator, and the impact of these interventions on African-American communities, in order to develop a high quality, evidence-based intervention to reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes amongst Aboriginal Australians.

 


Dr. Lois Harrison-Jones, Chair of the Department of Educational Administration and Policy, and Associate Professor, awarded the Effie Jones Humanitarian Award from the American Association of School Administrators (AASA).

harrison-jones

Dr. Lois Harrison-Jones, Chair of the Department of Educational Administration and Policy in the School of Education received the prestigious Dr. Effie H. Jones Humanitarian Award at the 2009 AASA National Conference on Education in San Francisco.

This award recognizes superintendents for lifetime achievement in the field of education, and honors the professional qualities of advocacy, support, mentorship, and encouragement of diversity in educational leadership. Dr. Harrison-Jones has been superintendent in Richmond VA and Boston, MA public school systems and has demonstrated an exceptional commitment to advancing the status of women and minorities in education throughout her career. 


School of Education Faculty Earns Prestigious Appointment in National Organization

thomasDr. Veronica Thomas, Professor in the Department of Human Development and Psychoeducational Studies, was recently appointed to the Executive Board of the American Evaluation Association (AEA). AEA is an international professional association of evaluators devoted to the application and exploration of program evaluation, personnel evaluation, technology, and many other forms of evaluation. Evaluation involves assessing the strengths and weaknesses of programs, policies, personnel, products, and organizations to improve their effectiveness. AEA has approximately 5000 members representing all 50 states in the US as well as over 60 foreign countries.


Dean Leslie T. Fenwick on C-SPAN education panel

fenwickDean Leslie T. Fenwick was a panelist at the "Refresh the World" symposium held at Howard University which was directed by movie producer Spike Lee and sponsored by PepsiCo. The education panel was moderated by Harvard Law professor, Charles Ogeltree, and, in addition to Dean Fenwick, featured urban school superintendents Arlene Ackerman (Philadelphia), Andres Alonso (Baltimore), Joel Klein (New York), Michelle Rhee (DC), and Paul Vallas (New Orleans). The video of the welcome and education panel can be seen on the C-SPAN archive at:

www.c-span.org/watch/watch.aspx?MediaId=HP-A-14489

 


Dr. Anthony Johnson presents his research about innovation and collaboration at AACTE

johnsonDr. Anthony Johnson, Assistant Dean for Assessment and Program Review in the Office of the Dean, since October 2007, spoke at the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education’s (AACTE) 61st Annual Meeting in Chicago, IL, February 6-9, 2009.

The presentation, entitled, “Innovation and Impact of Four HBCUs: Reciprocal, Intention and Sustainable Partnership”, was a collaborative effort including faculty from West Virginia State University, Lincoln University (MO), Alcorn State University (MS), and Howard University.  Dr. Johnson has experience working with PK-12 schools and serves on the NCATE Board of Examiners.  He also serves as an assessment consultant for Colleges of Education throughout the country.

Dr. Johnson most recent publication is published in The Encyclopedia of the African Diaspora, which focuses on looking beyond the increasing achievement gap.


Dr. Helen Bond, Assistant Professor in the Department of
Curriculum and Instruction, is a contributing author to the
recently released text, Paths to Teaching the Holocaust.

bondhDr. Helen Bond, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, is a contributor to the recently released text, Paths to Teaching the Holocaust. Dr. Bond’s chapter, “Teaching the Holocaust in the Urban Classroom: The Need to Know,” examines Holocaust education as a bridge to the study of conditions that have led to genocide throughout history. Additionally, her work reflects on the promise of public schools as a democratizing agent in American society and the world.


Dr. Kenneth Anderson authors Reading Achievement, Suspensions, and African American Males in Middle School


Dr. Kenneth AndersonDr. Kenneth Anderson is an assistant professor and coordinator of the Reading Education program in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. Anderson’s article, entitled Reading Achievement, Suspensions, and African American Males in Middle School, discusses the relationship of reading achievement and other demographic factors to suspensions of African-American males in the 6th, 7th and 8th grades. The impact of the Sustained Silent Reading Reflection Initiative (SSR2I) is introduced for its potential to remediate students who are referred for problem behaviors. Middle Grades Research Journal is a refereed journal published by Missouri State University's Institute for School Improvement. To view the article in PDF-format, click here Reading Achievement, Suspensions, and African American Males in Middle School.



Dr. Leslie Fenwick, Dean of the School of Education,
is Contributing Author to Recently Released Book,
The Last Word: The Best Commentary and Controversy
in American Education

Dean Fenwick Dr. Leslie T. Fenwick’s article, “Looking for Leaders in a Time of Change,” appears alongside articles by former President Bill Clinton; noted historian, John Hope Franklin; and prominent educators including Linda Darling-Hammond, and Howard Gardner in the book titled The Last Word: The Best Commentary and Controversy in American Education. The article addresses the changing nature of the principalship and was chosen as one of the best commentary essays in the 25-year history of Education Week. For more information about The Last Word: The Best Commentary and Controversy in American Education, visit
http://he-cda.wiley.com/WileyCDA/HigherEdTitle/productCd-0787996068.html.